Make an Animal Rescue Kit

Make an Animal Rescue Kit

In college I used to have this incredibly groovy Crusader mobile (Crusader was often my online handle—not in a religious way but as in an activist way, though now I realize, like a lot of things in my life, it was a bit pretentious). It was a Taurus wagon, and I had tie-dye seat covers, dinosaurs and funky pyramids glued to the dash, a Goonies pillow I made myself out of a t-shirt in the back, and the back of the thing was covered in bumper stickers. Man, I miss that car.

One of the things I loved about having the wagon was that I always had my “supplies.” I had campaign stickers, my internship forms (pamphlets, stickers, and other stuff for Planned Parenthood and Jobs for Justice), big boards and markers for impromptu rallies, and other stuff. One of the things I loved having around most was my animal rescue kit from PETA. (Yeah, we all have our love-hate relationships with the organization, but they do have some great resources and have done some great work among the sexist stuff they’ve done. I still consider them an excellent source of animal rights, pest catching, and pet care materials. Of course, I did request homeschooling materials from them twice last year and never received them...)

The thing is, though, you can make one of these kits on your own. Just keep a big box with air holes in it (if you can get an actual pet one from the humane society, even better!) or an animal carrier in your trunk along with a nylon lead and a towel. I also kept a collapsible food dish and bottle of water in mine with a small bag of food, which can be super helpful if you run across an animal on a long trip, like I could have on my hour and a half commute. You can also buy a collapsible animal carrier; we used to have a great one for our cats that somehow got mixed up with someone else’s when we got our little guy neutered.

Even if you have this kit with you, however, remember to use common sense when approaching animals. If the situation is too dangerous, you may need to call an animal organization for help. A friend of mine who runs a shelter out of her home (she has the biggest heart ever) says that you should set up traps to get stray animals who need help if they won’t come to you, too. You can find a great guide on how to do this here.